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Sociology

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InterLibrary Loan (ILL)
We will borrow it for you from other libraries. Generally, it takes around 3 weeks to arrive.

Reciprocal Borrowing
You may visit other libraries for onsite borrowing via METRO, VALENJ, and Jesuit Library Passport.

Call Numbers

Most books on sociology are arranged on the 3rd floor of the O'Toole Library.

You can browse the shelves, or more efficiently, search the library catalog to locate call numbers for the print collection.

H:  Social Sciences (General)

HM: Sociology (General)

HN:  Social history and conditions, Social problems, Social reform

HQ: The family, Marriage, Women

HS: Societies: Secret, benevolent, etc

HT: Communities, classes,. Races

HV: Social pathology. Social & public welfare. Criminology

HX: Socialism. Communism. Anarchism

 

Reference books, like encyclopedias, dictionaries and handbooks, are located in the ReadyRef area, on the 1st floor of the O'Toole Library.

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New Books

The Myth of Normal

Renowned physician, Gabor Mate's  groundbreaking investigation into the causes of illness, and a bracing critique of how our society breeds disease. Renowned physician Gabor Maté eloquently dissects how in Western countries that pride themselves on their healthcare systems, chronic illness and general ill health are on the rise, and offers a pathway to health and healing.  Over four decades of clinical experience, Maté has come to recognize the prevailing understanding of "normal" as false, neglecting the roles that trauma and stress, and the pressures of modern-day living, exert on our bodies and our minds at the expense of good health. For all our expertise and technological sophistication, Western medicine often fails to treat the whole person, ignoring how today's culture stresses the body, burdens the immune system, and undermines emotional balance. 

The Fifties

A bold and original argument that upends the myth of the Fifties as a decade of conformity to celebrate the solitary, brave, and stubborn individuals who pioneered the radical gay rights, feminist, civil rights, and environmental movements. In a fascinating and beautifully written series of character portraits, The Fifties invokes the accidental radicals--people motivated not by politics but by their own most intimate conflicts--who sparked movements for change in their time and our own. The Fifties is a dazzling and provocative work of history that transforms our understanding of a seemingly staid decade and honors the pioneers of gay rights, feminism, civil rights, and environmentalism. 

This Is Our Freedom

For the overwhelming majority of women leaving correctional institutions in the United States, there is one aspect of their identity that informs their needs, opportunities, hopes, and dreams: their roles as mothers. This Is Our Freedom provides an intimate and moving portrait of women's journeys prior to and after incarceration. In interviews with seventy formerly incarcerated mothers, Geniece Crawford Mondé captures how women reframe their marginalized identity and place themselves at the center of their own stories. 

Going Remote

A leading urban economist's hopeful study of how shifts to remote work can change all of our lives for the better.   As COVID-19 descended upon the country in 2020, millions of American office workers transitioned to working from home to reduce risk of infection and prevent spread of the virus. In the aftermath of this shift, a significant number of workers remain at least partially remote. It is clear that this massive experiment we were forced to run will have long-term consequences, changing the shape of our personal and work lives, as well as the urban landscape around us. How will the rise of telecommuting affect workers' quality of life, the profitability of firms, and the economic geography of our cities and suburbs? Going Remote addresses the uncertainties and possibilities of this moment. 

The Address Book

When most people think about street addresses, if they think of them at all, it is in their capacity to ensure that the postman can deliver mail or a traveler won't get lost. But street addresses were not invented to help you find your way; they were created to find you. In many parts of the world, your address can reveal your race and class. In this wide-ranging and remarkable book,  Filled with fascinating people and histories, The Address Book illuminates the complex and sometimes hidden stories behind street names and their power to name, to hide, to decide who counts, who doesn't--and why.

The Trayvon Generation

From a Pulitzer Prize finalist and New York Times bestselling author and poet comes a galvanizing meditation on the power of art and culture to illuminate America's unresolved problem with race. In the midst of civil unrest in the summer of 2020 and following the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery, Elizabeth Alexander turned a mother's eye to her sons' and students' generation and wrote a celebrated and moving reflection on the challenges facing young Black America. Originally published in the New Yorker, the essay incisively and lovingly observed the experiences, attitudes, and cultural expressions of what she referred to as the Trayvon Generation.  Alexander looks both to our past and our future with profound insight, brilliant analysis, and mighty heart, interweaving her voice with groundbreaking works of art by some of our most extraordinary artists. 

How to Be an Antiracist

The most courageous book to date on the problem of race in the Western mind."--The New York Times

Antiracism is a transformative concept that reorients and reenergizes the conversation about racism--and, even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. In How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi takes readers through a widening circle of antiracist ideas--from the most basic concepts to visionary possibilites--that will help readers see all forms of racism clearly, understand their posionous consequences, and work to oppose them in our systems and in ourselves. Kendi weaves an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science with his own personal story of awakening to antiracism.